The days at IBM

My first journey into my big boy pants job was at IBM through a contractor with CCI and I thought this was were I was going to stay. There were people onsite and I could mingle and play pranks. But I realized that my exterior personality needed to be authored to fit the status quo. This was always my challenge and never one that I won. But I accepted who I was and I lived through fun and games.

Some of the laughs we had were

I worked at the company for 8 years, I learned a lot made some great friends and even jump starts my technical career. I was able to support the Top 50 execs of the company, we were a small group of 8 but we did the job of 12. I moved all the way down the coast to be in a new place with a new set of friends and life choices.

This started me on Server Support in Atlanta and I loved it but not as much as home, and slowly my love for my job started to diregress and I focused on film, and the hipocrosay that IBM had was overwhelming. Advisors who “performed” but fucked off all day and were allowed. Or one person could watch a youtube video and the other can’t because they were a “Performer” I mean it was sickening.

At 25/27 I mean this was a entitled idea and one that ate me to my core, how could something that I put my heart into get second best to someone who just clocked in.. This was a radical idea that most people don’t understand…

YOU”RE NOT SPECIAL.

You have to make yourself special and that’s what I learned at IBM, numbers matter people don’t.. You have to make yourself stand out to what they want… Not what you can become.

Book Review Raving Fans: Ken Blanchard

Keeping up with customer service in my line of work is always a priority.  I generally love Ken’s work and look for new avenues to learn.

But for me and my years of service this falls on a book I should have read in the beginning.

  1.  Create exceptional products and service. 
  2. Ensure no customer is left unhappy.
  3. Always create exceptional experiences.

For anyone starting in Customer Services this is for you.  For seasoned pros that have a thriving business and follow these three rules.  Pass

If you don’t BUY it!

Book Review: Mary Jo Phel:Employee of the Month

Getting this book as a gift from Mary Jo was a spectacular gift in itself.  Reading her musings about life not only made me giggle but reminded me why I loved her in MST3K.

While most of the book is musing on various aspects on her life,  it is not wholly anecdotal.  She talks in sequence about how she got where she is from where she was.

Book Review: Beam Straight Up: The bold story of the first family of Bourbkn

I love any book based on bourbon, doubt the history of bourbon, or even had a drink bourbon! But when I delved into beam straight up I was a little disappointed it didn’t feel like a story that captivated me it felt more of a story that someone else wrote from Wikipedia. 

Well there were pictures in interesting anecdotes leave through the book it felt more of a narrative than a story and I didn’t have anybody in to any of the characters, I mean I knew they were living in a new they really did this but it felt was very matter-of-fact and not excited.

Now the beam story is an amazing one at best they created some of the worlds best bourbon and they are “the first family of bourbon “I just don’t know if it was worth the read.

As I write this I am pulling 100 proof bottle of Jim Beam out of the cabinet.

Bourbon Review: Willet Pot Still Reserve

I’ve always been enticed by the Bottling of Willet Pot Still Reserve,  the decanter shape and the attractive price. I picked up a dram at Stockyard.

 I’m not a fan of Rye and I didn’t think it would be as overpowering as it was in the drink.  Even cutting with rocks all I can taste was the Rye.

I prefer to get a mixture of flavors but just Rye was not my bag baby.

Book Review:Positioning-The Marketing Classic. 

Confidence is always the number one characteristic to help carry a audience.  number two is stories.  Engage your audience and they will return with your full attention.

Al Ries and Jack Trout do a good job enticing the readers that creating imagery and enticing stories to sell your products or launch your career.

The chapters are clear and concise and not overly wordy.  If your looking to create a new brand image pick up your own copy.